“look for the helpers. you will always find people who are helping”

19 Apr

Due to the horrific events that occurred at the Boston Marathon this past Monday, April 15, I feel obligated to at least comment on it in some way, no matter how small that way might be. I was in Watertown on the day of the marathon, but my friends and I had considered, albeit briefly, going into Boston to celebrate having the day off. When we heard the news of the explosions going off, I feel that there was a shared sense of not knowing how to comprehend, react, or take in and process what we had heard. I for one didn’t even think of the fact that there was a bombing when my friend first read the news, I think I just skipped over what she said before really thinking about the words that had come out of her mouth.

There was a sense of panic for a little while as I ran through my brain who I might know that could possibly have been at the marathon. Some of my cousins had gone to the Red Sox game that day and it had ended before the marathon, so I was nervous they had gone over to watch the runners. Thankfully, they were a mile away when the explosions went off. And then I remembered that the woman I babysit for was actually running in the marathon, but again, thankfully, she had already left the scene. She told me that she had actually finished the marathon fifteen minutes before the first explosion occurred, and I couldn’t help but think how horrible it would have been if she had taken longer to cross the finish line. I’m an agnostic, but in these moments, I threw out any disbelief I may have had and I was thanking God that no one I knew of (at least at the time, I was still thinking of who I might know from UMass that could be at the marathon, since a lot of people who go to UMass are from the Boston area) was injured.

But hearing everything about the deaths and the rising injury toll was so unsettling and upsetting as the day went on. I was eleven when 9/11 happened, and because I was so young and not in New York, it didn’t register to me at the time the full extent of what a horrible event it was. Although this was not nearly the same caliber as 9/11, it hit me so differently, since I’m older now and had to think about the fact that the explosions happened only miles from my home and that people I know could be dangerously affected by them, whether it being physically affected or emotionally, as people I know were bound to know other people who were hurt.

I talk shit about Boston a lot (I’ll be the first to admit it before anyone tries to call me out), mostly because I’ve been around the area for a while and am in the city multiple days a week, so I’m just too used to it and need a change of scenery. But really, I do love Boston. A part of me will forever remain in here. Sure, the people can be loud and obnoxious, but they’re also unique and colorful, no one can deny that. No one at the marathon could have possibly deserved what happened. I complain about people a lot, but I truly believe that. The fact that so many innocent people were attacked while watching something as wholesome as a marathon (it’s really upsetting that this happened at such an innocent event that had no ties to politics or religion, which people are always fighting about. This was seriously such an uncontroversial event, it shows that people just want to see the world be destroyed) still makes me sick to my stomach. But, as Obama has said, Boston is resilient. All of his words about Bostonians are true. Bostonians know how to come to together in times of trouble and work to rise above it all. And for that, I am really thankful, and my heart seriously hurts for everyone who was injured or affected in any possible way by these attacks.

It’s also truly something amazing to see the outpouring of love from people in other countries, where attacks like this are an everyday occurrence. I cannot even begin to fathom how these people get by in their day-to-day lives. It’s really incredible to me, and my heart also goes out to them. I don’t know what is wrong with some people on this Earth, but seeing such demonstrations of love and care from all around shows me that despite how much I might not understand society or why humans can act so terribly to one another, there are amazing people out there still who can take the time to not dwell on their own suffering and offer some encouraging words to those of us who haven’t dealt with such traumatic events so we don’t necessarily know how to handle them. I need to keep such thoughts in the back of my head as time goes on, because it’s nice to be reminded that there is good in the world, despite all of the ugliness that may be around.

Boston strong.

Boston strong.

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